theatlantic:

Iran Reenacts History With a Giant Cardboard Cut-Out Ayatollah
On this day in 1979, Iranian religious leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini returned home after 14 years in exile. This morning, the Army of the Islamic Republic of Iran reenacted the very important moment in their country’s history with a very bizarre ceremony — and a cardboard cut-out of Khomeini. Read more.
[Image: Mehr News Agency]

I just…  Really?  Sigh…
Keep 
Calm
and
Fake 
It

theatlantic:

Iran Reenacts History With a Giant Cardboard Cut-Out Ayatollah

On this day in 1979, Iranian religious leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini returned home after 14 years in exile. This morning, the Army of the Islamic Republic of Iran reenacted the very important moment in their country’s history with a very bizarre ceremony — and a cardboard cut-out of Khomeini. Read more.

[Image: Mehr News Agency]

I just…  Really?  Sigh…

Keep 

Calm

and

Fake 

It

Reblogged from The Atlantic
npr:

To capture the perfect wildlife image, you usually have to be in exactly the right place at precisely the right time.
But in this instance, David Slater wasn’t there at all and he still got a result.
Visiting  a national park in North Sulawesi, Indonesia, award-winning  photographer Mr Slater left his camera unattended for a while.
It  soon attracted the attention of an inquisitive female from a local  group of crested black macaque monkeys, known for their intelligence and  dexterity.
Fascinated by her reflection in the lens, she then somehow managed to start the camera. The upshot: A splendid self-portrait.
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2011051/Black-macaque-takes-self-portrait-Monkey-borrows-photographers-camera.html#ixzz1S5cwVhF7

When I try to take a photo of myself, I usually look stupid with half of my head in the frame.  Nice to know there is one more thing that even a monkey could do that I couldn’t…

npr:

To capture the perfect wildlife image, you usually have to be in exactly the right place at precisely the right time.

But in this instance, David Slater wasn’t there at all and he still got a result.

Visiting a national park in North Sulawesi, Indonesia, award-winning photographer Mr Slater left his camera unattended for a while.

It soon attracted the attention of an inquisitive female from a local group of crested black macaque monkeys, known for their intelligence and dexterity.

Fascinated by her reflection in the lens, she then somehow managed to start the camera. The upshot: A splendid self-portrait.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2011051/Black-macaque-takes-self-portrait-Monkey-borrows-photographers-camera.html#ixzz1S5cwVhF7

When I try to take a photo of myself, I usually look stupid with half of my head in the frame.  Nice to know there is one more thing that even a monkey could do that I couldn’t…

Reblogged from NPR